Money-making scam Crypto Revolt uses Sonny Bill Williams in fake news story

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Money-making scam Crypto Revolt uses Sonny Bill Williams in fake news story

Sonny Bill Williams has been caught up in a fake news story promoting Crypto Revolt, a computer app said to make users large amounts of money but which has been labelled a scam.

The fake news story circulating on Facebook tells of Williams’ delight in informing One’s Breakfast hosts Jack Tame and Haley Holt that his wife earns more money than him.

The All Black, who returned from the Northern Hemisphere tour injured after the clash against England earlier this month, is described in the story as recently appearing on the television show and talking about how his wife and mother of their three children, Alana Raffie, is the “real breadwinner” in their family.

Williams, who has earned millions through playing professional rugby league and rugby, is quoted as saying: “Well, the fact is that she has made more money than me without even leaving the house”.

“It took her a couple of days to get the hang of it but then she got really good at this amazing computer programme called Crypto Revolt!”

The story then details Williams explaining how to use the “specially-developed software” that uses market trading to earn its investors money.

But some glaring errors, including that the story puts Holt’s age at 53 by quoting her as saying she was born in 1965, help give away that it is fake news.

That and the fact the interview never happened.

Crypto Revolt has been slammed as a get-rich-quick scheme by ScamCryptorobots.com, a website designed to expose fraudulent bitcoin and crypto signals.

Of Crypto Revolt, the website said: “Crypto Revolt is not a trustworthy software and you would be wise to keep your distance and never sign up for the app”.

Sonny Bill Williams' wife and mother of their three children Alana Raffie makes more money than him according to a fake news story promoting a get-rick-quick scam. Photo / Instagram
Sonny Bill Williams’ wife and mother of their three children Alana Raffie makes more money than him according to a fake news story promoting a get-rick-quick scam. Photo / Instagram

The website said fake news ads with Elon Musk and Richard Branson were running on Facebook and Google promoting Crypto Revolt.

“Big media companies selling advertising space are getting paid premium rates because opportunity seekers much like yourself are willing to click phony advertisements and invest in crypto scams.

“It’s very possible that you will be exposed to promotional material which is based on your geographic location.”

For example English residents were targeted with fake news ads using British chef Gordon Ramsey.

Last year, former Prime Minister Sir John Key said it was outrageous Facebook refused to pull posts that linked to a fake NZ Herald website in which Key was purported to endorse Bitcoin.

Key was featured prominently in the fake Herald web page – set up by an overseas website – which included claims he had told Bloomberg he had invested in Bitcoin early on and an initial $1000 investment was now worth $300 million, all of which Key said was false.

In April last year Facebook said it was fighting the spread of fake news.

“False news is harmful to our community, it makes the world less informed, and it erodes trust.”

The Herald has tried to contact Williams through his agent for comment.

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